October 7 – 8, 2022

Lives and Legends of the Mystic Plains

One Man Show

InSight Gallery
Fredericksberg, TX

CRAZY HORSE
Oracle III
Society Sister
Society of Little People
Mandan Chief, Four Bears
CRAZY HORSE II
Sister of the Plains

Pariskaroopa Dog Soldier, 1834

Leader of Men

Lodge Of The Bear Clan

Crazy Horse II

50″ x 28″
OIL ON CANVAS

My painting shows Crazy Horse standing in front of his exploit robe which chronicles the famous battle with Custer in 1876. 

The painted hail stones and lightning bolt on his face depict his personal power that he received in a vision.  He most commonly wore the skin of a kestrel in his hair but a credible account relates that he occasionally wore a full mounted kestrel as a headdress.  The eagle thigh bone whistle, war club, spotted buffalo calf cape and an 1866 Winchester Yellow Boy rifle all were mentioned in historic documents as part of his battle gear.

No photo of Crazy Horse exists – only eye witness descriptions.

This piece will be sold by silent bid the evening of October 8, 2022. Bids will be accepted in person at InSight Gallery or online by calling the gallery at 830.997.9920. Bidding closes at 6 pm CST on October 8.

Minimum bid:  $85,000.00

Society Of Little People

20” x 18”
OIL ON BOARD

Native American children were encouraged to role model the adults.  My painting shows a little girl holding council with the members of her society.

Society Of Little People

20” x 18”
OIL ON BOARD

Native American children were encouraged to role model the adults.  My painting shows a little girl holding council with the members of her society.

Pariskaroopa Dog Soldier, 1834

21.5” x 29”
OIL ON BOARD

Karl Bodmer’s renowned painting of the Dog Dancer illustrates the persona of one of the elite soldiers of the Hidatsa.  The Dog Soldiers were famous for their fearless tactics in battle.  They would stake themselves to the battleground which although it made victory more difficult, was a way of fighting that enhanced their status beyond all other warriors.

I’ve referenced my painting using Bodmer’s historic image as to how Pariskaroopa looked in 1834 in full battle regalia.

Mandan Chief, Four bears

39.5” x 23.5”
CHARCOAL ON PAPER

Four Bears was one of the most well known of the chiefs of the 1830’s.  Both Karl Bodmer and George Catlin painted his portrait.   He had a special relationship with both of these men as he fancied himself as an artist as well. 

He earned his name Four Bears after having avenged his brother’s death in battle as it was said that he fought with the veracity of four bears.

I’ve portrayed him in his battle regalia which shows some of the symbols of his victories.  The six sticks in his hair represent killing six men with a gun. The symbol of a wooden knife represents that he killed a Cheyenne Chief and the split turkey feather represents being wounded with an arrow.

Mandan Chief, Four bears

39.5” x 23.5”
CHARCOAL ON PAPER

Four Bears was one of the most well known of the chiefs of the 1830’s.  Both Karl Bodmer and George Catlin painted his portrait.   He had a special relationship with both of these men as he fancied himself as an artist as well.

He earned his name Four Bears after having avenged his brother’s death in battle as it was said that he fought with the veracity of four bears.

I’ve portrayed him in his battle regalia which shows some of the symbols of his victories.  The six sticks in his hair represent killing six men with a gun. The symbol of a wooden knife represents that he killed a Cheyenne Chief and the split turkey feather represents being wounded with an arrow.

Crazy Horse

33.5” H x 21” W x 12” D
BRONZE EDITION, OF 20

I have a special affinity towards Crazy Horse because of his importance in history.

He was one of the Sioux’s most prominent and spiritual leaders and is perhaps most notably accredited with leading the decisive charge that killed Custer in the Battle of Little Big Horn.

I’ve chosen to depict him in a portrait style with some of his famous accoutrements and decorations.  His repeating Yellow Boy rifle gave his tribe the edge over the cavalry’s single shot rifles during that famous battle.  Historically, Crazy Horse was known to have a penchant for the falcon and I have depicted him with a kestrel headdress.   His spotted buffalo calf cape, war club and eagle wing bone whistle were also favorite accoutrements.

Crazy Horse was never photographed but his likeness has come through the stories of his family.

 Oracle III

64″ x 38″
CHARCOAL ON PAPER

The idea of an Oracle has long been a favorite subject of mine.  The majority of famous chiefs and warriors were also medicine men.  George Catlin described one of the Mandan Medicine Men as a mystic, soothsayer and oracle.  The name for my drawing was inspired by his description. 

 Oracle III

64″ x 38″
CHARCOAL ON PAPER

The idea of an Oracle has long been a favorite subject of mine.  The majority of famous chiefs and warriors were also medicine men.  George Catlin described one of the Mandan Medicine Men as a mystic, soothsayer and oracle.  The name for my drawing was inspired by his description.

Society Sister

37” x 23”
OIL ON CANVAS

Native American women held a powerful position within the tribe.  The tipi and most of its contents were owned by the women.  Like the men, they had their own societies that were important in the distribution of responsibility and power.

Men had the role of protecting and hunting.  Women did everything else.  In my painting, my subject is a young Sioux woman whose physical appearance is deceptive considering the power she holds.

Her staff is a symbol of her status.

Lodge Of The Bear Clan

33.5” x 44”
OIL ON CANVAS

Some Native American tribes think of the grizzly bear as their ancestor.  Their association with the grizzly not only affords them great power in battle, but also the ability to heal.

Lodge Of The Bear Clan

33.5” x 44”
OIL ON CANVAS

Some Native American tribes think of the grizzly bear as their ancestor.  Their association with the grizzly not only affords them great power in battle, but also the ability to heal.

Sister of the Plains

11” H x 7” W x 4.5” D
BRONZE EDITION, OF 35

My sculpture, Sister of the Plains, is based on a young girl of the Lakota, circa 1870.

Leader of men

22.25” x 26”
OIL ON CANVAS

In most Native American cultures, the full eagle war bonnet is the ultimate symbol of power and prestige.  From an artistic design point of view, it subliminally mirrors strength in nature.  As in rays of the sun, or in this case, the mane of a lion.

Leader of Men is a simple statement of a warrior who possesses accoutrements of a successful history as a tribal leader and in his expression, a sense of quiet dignity.

Leader of men

22.25” x 26”
OIL ON CANVAS

In most Native American cultures, the full eagle war bonnet is the ultimate symbol of power and prestige.  From an artistic design point of view, it subliminally mirrors strength in nature.  As in rays of the sun, or in this case, the mane of a lion.

Leader of Men is a simple statement of a warrior who possesses accoutrements of a successful history as a tribal leader and in his expression, a sense of quiet dignity.

OCTOBER 7-8, 2022

Lives and Legends of the Mystic Plains

Attend this Spectacular One Man Show

InSight Gallery  |  Fredericksberg, TX